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Welcome to the page about persistent organic pollutants (POP's) hotspots Database

Industrialization induces the use of chemicals from as modest quantity for use as a catalyst in process industries, in order to increase efficiency or to add value, to a transformed product to enable market penetration and enhance competitiveness. Some of these chemicals have been extensively used in the rapidly growing but also in LDCs economies and which have resulted in negative social and environment impacts. These adverse impacts need to be examined and solutions to these problems need to be properly addressed. Multilateral environmental agreements have been the environment vehicle for the world, giving guidance and producing guidelines for the reduction and elimination of the harmful effects to health and the environment of these chemicals and their waste stockpiles.

Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and other toxic chemicals are currently in use legally and illegally in Africa’s agricultural industry and health sectors as pesticides and industrial chemicals. There are scientific evidences, which show that exposure of human and the wildlife to POPs causes severe harm to health. They especially contaminate farmers and workers who are exposed to POPs chemicals in their occupation. The rural community settlements, which are prone to malaria, increase the exposure of the population to malaria control POPs such as DDT. The continuing illegal use of POPs pesticides among the rural community, especially in agriculture further increases their exposure to and health risk from such POPs. Therefore, the diminished socio-economic opportunities of the rural community can be further reduced by the ill health and environmental degradation resulting from the exposure to POPs. These effects can lead to a declining spiral of poverty, including contaminated resource base, declining food quality, deteriorating mental and physical health and reduced livelihood potential. At a macroeconomic

level, the consequences of POPs exposure may also be significant.
As part of concerted efforts to identify, characterize and document POPs hotspots in participating countries, a database of the sites in those countries has been created and maintained here.

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09 April 2017
09 April 2017

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